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Frequently Asked Questions

Do you have other questions?  Please feel free to contact us.

Training for Ordained Ministry

I’m really interested in Ordained Ministry.  What do I do next?

Prospective Ordinands are sponsored by their local diocese for study.  Following initial prayer and reflection, the first step in discerning a possible call to ordained ministry is to speak to your local incumbent in the first instance, who will connect you with the Vocations team in your local Diocese.  The Church of England has both local (diocesan) and national selection processes for discerning whether someone is called to ordained ministry.

How long is the training?

Our part-time ordination training programmes range from two to three years.  The specific training programme studied will depend on your previous qualifications and experience, and the recommendations of your local Diocese, and from your Bishops’ Advisory Panel.  Your sponsoring Bishop will make the final decision on your training pathway.

When does training take place?

Weeknight sessions are organised in three terms with a half-term break in each. Weeknights begin in early September and continue to the Summer. Each Diocese has teaching one evening a week, but All Saints students can attend any centre and are offered a choice at the start of their course.  There are six residential weekends and one residential week away each year, based in the North West.

Where does it happen?

There is a teaching centre in each Diocese. Weeknight training is delivered in several venues across the region.  Currently, the main teaching venues for the North-West are in Blackburn, Liverpool, Manchester and Warrington. There is also a teaching centre on the Isle of Man.

Will I have to write a lot of essays?

Each module is assessed to make sure that those in training are meeting the required standard for ordination. There are assessments for each module, and we have crafted our training programmes to include a variety of assessment methods:

  • Written assignments (includes theological reflections, survey of mission opportunities in a parish, resources that could be used in a local parish as well as study of a passage of a Bible); and
  • Placement-based practical assessments (including presentations in a church context, writing and delivering sermons).

How much work is it?

While the course is part-time, it is a significant time commitment.  Students will need to commit to roughly 200 hours of study and contact hours per 20 credit module.  Over the year this includes:

  • the formal study programme (up to 30 weeknights and 6 residential weekends and 1 residential week per year);
  • an average of 4 to 5 hours per week in placement activity in your home or external placement church;
  • up to 5 hours of reading per week, plus the time needed for additional private study, completing assignments, meeting with supervisors and tutors, etc.

In addition to setting aside time to study, we advise you to consider how much time outside of work you will need to engage with the Bible, prayer, worship and other spiritual practices, and spend with friends and family.

How much does it cost?

Tuition fees and training costs are paid for you by your diocese, funded by a block grant from the Church of England’s Ministry Division.  We recommend that you speak with your local Diocese regarding any other financial support that may be available to you during training.

Lay Ministry – Training to be a Reader

What is Reader Ministry?

There is a brief introduction to Reader ministry on our Training for Lay Ministry Page.  The Church of England’s website, Readers, is a useful source of information on Reader Ministry, and defines Readers as “…lay people, called by God, trained and licensed by the Church to preach, teach, lead worship and assist in pastoral, evangelistic and liturgical work.”

Your local diocese’s website should also give some information on what Reader Ministry, and other types of Lay Ministry look like in your region, as well as details of useful contacts and expectations regarding selection and training of Readers.

I’m really interested in Reader Ministry.  What do I do next?

Following initial prayer and reflection, the first step in discerning a possible call to Reader Ministry is to speak to your incumbent.  Readers are licensed to the incumbent, and you will need your incumbent’s support.  Your incumbent can get an application pack from the Diocesan Warden of Readers.  There is an annual deadline for applications, which is usually advertised on a Diocese’s website.

What is the process for selection?

The Warden of Readers arranges selection panels each year which typically take place in Spring.  The panel will either recommend you for training or suggest that you undertake some preparatory work with your incumbent.  Once you have been recommended for training as a Reader candidate by your sponsoring Diocese, we will accept and progress your application to train with All Saints.

How long is the training?

The initial Reader training course with All Saints consists of two academic years of training. After licensing as a Reader, each diocese has a specific programme of post-licensing training for Readers.

When does training take place?

Weeknight sessions are organised in three terms with a half-term break in each. Weeknights begin in early September and continue to the Summer. Each Diocese has teaching one evening a week, but All Saints students can attend any centre and are offered a choice at the start of their course.  There are two Reader Study Days per term held at weekends.

Where does it happen?

There is a teaching centre in each Diocese. Weeknight training is delivered in several venues across the region.  Currently, the main teaching venues for the North-West are in Blackburn, Liverpool, Manchester and Warrington. There is also a teaching centre on the Isle of Man.

Will I have to write a lot of essays?

Each module is assessed to make sure that those in training are meeting the required standard for licensing as a Reader. There are assessments for each module, and we have crafted our Reader training programme to include a variety of assessment methods:

  • Written assignments (includes theological reflections, survey of mission opportunities in a parish, resources that could be used in a local parish as well as study of a passage of a Bible); and
  • Placement-based practical assessments (including presentations in a church context, writing and delivering sermons).

Will I get an academic award at the end of my course?

All the modules can be studied as part of an academic award, but it’s important to note that each sponsoring diocese has its own policy on whether Reader training will result in an academic award.

How much work is it?

While the course is part-time, it is a significant time commitment.  In order to complete Reader training, students will need to commit to roughly 200 hours of study and contact hours per 20 credit module.  Over the year this includes:

  • the formal study programme (up to 30 weeknights and 6 weekend study days);
  • an average of 4 to 5 hours per week in placement activity in your home or external placement church;
  • up to 5 hours of reading per week, plus the time needed for additional private study, completing assignments, meeting with supervisors and tutors, etc.

In addition to setting aside time to study, we advise you to consider how much time outside of work you will need to engage with the Bible, prayer, worship and other spiritual practices, and spend with friends and family.

How much does it cost?

Tuition fees are paid for you by your Diocese.

 

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